NextStage Evolution Research Brief – EU Audiences Adapt to and Integrate Site Redesigns Faster than US, GB and Oz Audiences

Basis: This publication concludes a two year study of visitor adaptation to and adoption of new technologies and site redesigns on similar product or purpose sites in the US, EU, GB and Australia. No Asian, South American or African sites were part of this study.

Objective: To determine if neuro-cognitive information biases exist in certain cultures and if so, is there benefit or detriment to those biases?

Method: Twenty sites (monthly visitor populations between 10-35k) were monitored in the USA, Italy, France, Germany, Great Britain and Australia. The sites included social platforms, ecommerce, news-aggregator, travel-destination and research postings. Activity levels were monitored before, during and after design changes were instituted, as well as before, during and after new technologies (podcasts, vcasts, YouTube feeds, social tools) were placed on the sites.

In addition to activity levels a study was made of viral propagation vectors to determine if changes to the site promoted new influencers or demoted existing influencers.

Results:

  • Announced changes to the sites increased adoption and adaptation rates among all visitors (in some cases by as much as 65%)
    • Announced changes most greatly benefitted US, GB and Australian audiences with adaptation and adoption rates increasing 12.5% on average.
  • Site previews increased adoption and adaptation rates among all visitors
    • 77% of EU based visitors who chose to preview site changes became influencers regardless previous social standing on site.
    • 35% of US based visitors who chose to preview site changes became influencers regardless of previous social standing on site.
    • 32.5% of Australian based visitors who chose to preview site changes became influencers regardless of previous social standing on site.
    • 27.5% of GB based visitors who chose to preview site changes became influencers regardless of previous social standing on site.
  • EU audiences demonstrated the highest rates of adaptation to and adoption of new technologies and site redesigns in all categories at 92.5% and 85% respectively.
  • Australian audiences demonstrated the lowest rates of adaptation to and adoption of new technologies and site redesigns in all categories at 30% and 7.5% respectively.

Key take-aways for this research include

  • Travel destination sites should provide a good deal of lead up time to site changes.
    • This lead up time should include previews and announcements.
    • This is especially true for US audiences.
  • Sites introducing social tools should select, train and promote influencers from within the existing visitor community before the social tools are made public.
  • The introduction of social tools to news-aggregator sites recognizably slowed the adaptation and adoption rates of EU audiences.
  • US based audiences were most likely to contact site admins, web admins, managers, etc., criticizing site redesigns and new technology implementations although they were the least likely to abandon sites due to those changes.
  • Australian audiences were the least likely to contact site admins, web admins, managers, etc., criticizing site redesigns and new technology implementations although they were the most likely to abandon a site due to those changes.
  • EU based audiences were the most likely to visit several sites all serving the same purpose.
  • EU based audiences were the most likely to give a site “time to settle” during redesign and new technology implementation before returning to it on a regular basis.

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